Lawn Care for All North Carolina Grass Species & Types

Barefoot & Associates has more than 23 years experience seeding, sodding, growing and maintaining grass in North Carolina. We know that lawns and turf in North Carolina has to be able to stand up to a lot. The soil can be sandy, and the summers are brutally hot. Because of this, species of warm-season grasses are most commonly used in NC turf and landscaping.

Our Raleigh lawn maintenance team has experience servicing the most common North Carolina grass types, including fescues, bermuda, zoysia and centipede grass. We know the best use for each type, and the specific care each requires. With our lawn and preventive turf health care, we keep your lawn looking lush and healthy.

We’ve included descriptions of different types of grass we service, courtesy of NC State University’s TurfFiles.

Fescue Grass

Fescue GrassTall fescue is the most widely grown cool-season species in North Carolina. For a cool-season species, tall fescue is tolerant to heat and drought, disease resistant, and persists with minimum care. It has a tendency to clump due to its bunch-type growth habit and may need to be re-seeded each year in areas that exhibit thin growth patterns due to excessive summer stresses.

Bermuda Grass

Bermuda GrassBermudagrass is a medium- to fine-textured warm-season turfgrass that spreads by rhizomes and stolons. It has excellent heat, drought, and salt tolerance but does not do well in shade. Bermudagrass is the most widely used species on athletic fields and golf course fairways/tee boxes due to its high wear tolerance and rapid recovery. It can also be a very invasive and hard to control weed in some turf settings.

Bermudagrass is also often confused with zoysiagrass, but zoysiagrass has hairs standing upright on the leaf blade, whereas bermudagrass does not. Zoysiagrass is also stiff to the touch and offers more resistance to your hand than bermudagrass. Zoysiagrass leaf vernation is rolled whereas bermudagrass leaf vernation is folded. There are many different hybrids of bermudagrass that range from fine to coarse in leaf texture. As a weed, bermudagrass is sometimes referred to as wiregrass.

Zoysia Grass

Zoysia GrassZoysiagrass is a warm-season grass that spreads by rhizomes and stolons to produce a very dense, wear-resistant turf. It is best adapted to the Piedmont and Coastal Plain regions of North Carolina, but some of the more cold tolerant cultivars can be grown in the western part of the state as well. There are three major species of zoysiagrass suitable for turf including Japanese lawngrass (Z. japonica), mascarenegrass (Z.tenuifolia), and manilagrass (Z. matrella). Zoysiagrass can often be confused with bermudagrass. However, zoysiagrass has hairs standing upright on the leaf blade whereas bermudagrass does not. Zoysiagrass is also stiff to the touch and offers more resistance than bermudagrass.

Centipede Grass

Centipede GrassCentipedegrass is a slow-growing, coarse-textured, warm-season turf that is adapted for use in low maintenance situations. It is often referred to as “lazy man’s grass” due to its infrequent mowing and fertilization requirements. It also has a light-green color and spreads by stolons. It does not tolerate traffic, compaction, high pH, excessive thatch, drought, or heavy shade. Centipedegrass can often be confused with St. Augustinegrass. However, centipedegrass has alternating leaves at the nodes whereas St. Augustinegrass has opposite leaves at the nodes. Centipedegrass also has a more pointed, slenderer leaf blade than St. Augustinegrass. Both leaf blades are V-shaped in cross section, but that of St. Augustinegrass has a more obviously boat-shaped tip.

St. Augustine Grass

St. Augustine GrassSt. Augustinegrass is a warm-season grass with medium density and medium to dark green color. Of all the warm season grasses, it is the least cold tolerant and has the coarsest leaf texture. St. Augustinegrass grows best in warm, humid areas that are not exposed to long periods of cold weather. In fact, its lack of cold tolerance is the major limiting factor in determining its use in North Carolina. Centipedegrass can often be confused with St. Augustinegrass. However, centipedegrass has alternating leaves at the nodes whereas St. Augustinegrass has opposite leaves at the nodes. Centipedegrass also has a more pointed, slenderer leaf blade than St. Augustinegrass. Both leaf blades are V-shaped in cross section, but that of St. Augustinegrass has a more obviously boat-shaped tip.

Barefoot & Associates has a lawn solution for every problem, turf need, or grass type. Call us today to discuss your lawn care needs and get a free quote. Based out of Smithfield, NC, we are proud to serve the surrounding areas, including Raleigh, Cary, Apex, Fuquay Varina, Garner, Wake Forest, Knightdale, Wendell, Clayton, Smithfield, Selma, Pine Level, Princeton, Goldsboro, Four Oaks, Benson, Dunn, Coats, & Buies Creek, NC.